Thoughts filed in: Django

31
Mar

Using PayPal WPS with Cartridge (Mezzanine / Django)

I recently built a web site using Mezzanine, a CMS built on top of Django. I decided to go with Mezzanine (which I've never used before) for two reasons: it nicely enhances Django's admin experience (plus it enhances, but doesn't get in the way of, the Django developer experience); and there's a shopping cart app called Cartridge that's built on top of Mezzanine, and for this particular site (a children's art class business in Sydney) I needed shopping cart / e-commerce functionality.

This suite turned out to deliver virtually everything I needed out-of-the-box, with one exception: Cartridge currently lacks support for payment methods that require redirecting to the payment gateway and then returning after payment completion (such as PayPal Website Payments Standard, or WPS). It only supports payment methods where payment is completed on-site (such as PayPal Website Payments Pro, or WPP). In this case, with the project being small and low-budget, I wanted to avoid the overhead of dealing with SSL and on-site payment, so PayPal WPS was the obvious candidate.

Turns out that, with a bit of hackery, making Cartridge play nice with WPS isn't too hard to achieve. Here's how you go about it.

02
Nov

Django Facebook user integration with whitelisting

It's recently become quite popular for web sites to abandon the tasks of user authentication and account management, and to instead shoulder off this burden to a third-party service. One of the big services available for this purpose is Facebook. You may have noticed "Sign in with Facebook" buttons appearing ever more frequently around the 'Web.

The common workflow for Facebook user integration is: user is redirected to the Facebook login page (or is shown this page in a popup); user enters credentials; user is asked to authorise the sharing of Facebook account data with the non-Facebook source; a local account is automatically created for the user on the non-Facebook site; user is redirected to, and is automatically logged in to, the non-Facebook site. Also quite common is for the user's Facebook profile picture to be queried, and to be shown as the user's avatar on the non-Facebook site.

This article demonstrates how to achieve this common workflow in Django, with some added sugary sweetness: maintaning a whitelist of Facebook user IDs in your local database, and only authenticating and auto-registering users who exist on this whitelist.

10
Feb

Solr, Jetty, and daemons: debugging jetty.sh

I recently added a Solr-powered search feature to this site (using django-haystack). Rather than go to the trouble (and server resources drain) of deploying Solr via Tomcat, I decided instead to deploy it via Jetty. There's a wiki page with detailed instructions for deploying Solr with Jetty, and the wiki page also includes a link to the jetty.sh startup script.

The instructions seem simple enough. However, I ran into some serious problems when trying to get the startup script to work. The standard java -jar start.jar was working fine for me. But after following the instructions to the letter, and after double-checking everything, a call to:

sudo /etc/init.d/jetty start

still resulted in my getting the (incredibly unhelpful) error message:

Starting Jetty: FAILED

My server is running Ubuntu Jaunty (9.04), and from my experience, the start-stop-daemon command in jetty.sh doesn't work on that platform. Let me know if you've experienced the same or similar issues on other *nix flavours or on other Ubuntu versions. Your mileage may vary.

31
Jan

Jimmy Page: site-wide Django page caching made simple

For some time, I've been using the per-site cache feature that comes included with Django. This site's caching needs are very modest: small personal site, updated infrequently, with two simple blog-like sections and a handful of static pages. Plus, it runs fast enough even without any caching. A simple "brute force" solution like Django's per-site cache is more than adequate.

However, I grew tired of the fact that whenever I published new content, nothing was invalidated in the cache. I began to develop a routine of first writing and publishing the content in the Django admin, and then SSHing in to my box and restarting memcached. Not a good regime! But then again, I also couldn't bring myself to make the effort of writing custom invalidation routines for my cached pages. Considering my modest needs, it just wasn't worth it. What I needed was a solution that takes the same "brute force" page caching approach that Django's per-site cache already provided for me, but that also includes a similarly "brute force" approach to invalidation. Enter Jimmy Page.

06
Jun

An inline image Django template filter

Adding image fields to a Django model is easy, thanks to the built-in ImageField class. Auto-resizing uploaded images is also a breeze, courtesy of sorl-thumbnail and its forks/variants. But what about embedding resized images inline within text content? This is a very common use case for bloggers, and it's a final step that seems to be missing in Django at the moment.

Having recently migrated this site over from Drupal, my old blog posts had inline images embedded using image assist. Images could be inserted into an arbitrary spot within a text field by entering a token, with a syntax of [img_assist nid=123 ... ]. I wanted to be able to continue embedding images in roughly the same fashion, using a syntax as closely matching the old one as possible.

So, I've written a simple template filter that parses a text block for tokens with a syntax of [thumbnail image-identifier], and that replaces every such token with the image matching the given identifier, resized according to a pre-determined width and height (by sorl-thumbnail), and formatted as an image tag with a caption underneath. The code for the filter is below.

30
May

An autop Django template filter

autop is a script that was first written for WordPress by Matt Mullenweg (the WordPress founder). All WordPress blog posts are filtered using wpautop() (unless you install an additional plug-in to disable the filter). The function was also ported to Drupal, and it's enabled by default when entering body text into Drupal nodes. As far as I'm aware, autop has never been ported to a language other than PHP. Until now.

In the process of migrating this site from Drupal to Django, I was surprised to discover that not only Django, but also Python in general, lacks any linebreak filtering function (official or otherwise) that's anywhere near as intelligent as autop. The built-in Django linebreaks filter converts all single newlines to <br /> tags, and all double newlines to <p> tags, completely irrespective of HTML block elements such as <code> and <script>. This was a fairly major problem for me, as I was migrating a lot of old content over from Drupal, and that content was all formatted in autop style. Plus, I'm used to writing content in that way, and I'd like to continue writing content in that way, whether I'm in a PHP environment or not.

Therefore, I've ported Drupal's _filter_autop() function to Python, and implemented it as a Django template filter. From the limited testing I've done, the function appears to be working just as well in Django as it does in Drupal. You can find the function below.

10
Mar

Refugee Buddy: a project of OzSiCamp Sydney 2010

Last weekend, I attended Social Innovation Camp Sydney 2010. SiCamp is an event where several teams have one weekend in which to take an idea for an online social innovation technology, and to make something of it. Ideally, the technology gets built and deployed by the end of the camp, but if a team doesn't reach that stage, simply developing the concept is an acceptable outcome as well.

I was part of a team of seven (including our team leader), and we were the team that built Refugee Buddy. As the site's slogan says: "Refugee Buddy is a way for you to welcome people to your community from other cultures and countries." It allows regular Australians to sign up and become volunteers to help out people in our community who are refugees from overseas. It then allows refugee welfare organisations (both governmnent and independent) to search the database of volunteers, and to match "buddies" with people in need.

Of the eight teams present at this OzSiCamp, we won! Big congratulations to everyone on the team: Oz, Alex, James, Daniela, Tom, (and Jeremy — that's me!) and most of all Joy, who came to the camp with a great concept, and who provided sound leadership to the rest of us. Personally, I really enjoyed working on Refugee Buddy, and I felt that the team had a great vibe and the perfect mix of skills.